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News on Human Progress:
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(Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology) Researchers are investigating microneedles, nanoparticles and polymer carriers as potential new techniques to combat the leading cause of visual impairment and blindness in the United States, according to a report from the Third Annual ARVO/Pfizer Ophthalmics Research Institute Conference.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on November 17 2008 by Thoughtbot
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(DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory) A Cray XT high-performance computing system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is the world's fastest supercomputer for science. The Cray XT, called Jaguar, has a peak performance of 1.64 petaflops, (quadrillion floating point operations, or calculations) per second, incorporating a 1.382 petaflops XT5 and a 266 teraflops XT4 systems.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on November 17 2008 by Thoughtbot
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In research that may redefine ear buds, earphones, stereo loudspeakers, and other devices for producing sound, researchers in China are reporting development of flexible loudspeakers thinner than paper that might be inserted into the ears with an index finger or attached to clothing, walls, or windows. Their report on what may be the world's thinnest loudspeakers, made from transparent carbon nanotube films, is scheduled for the December 10 issue ... More
PhysOrg.com news made popular on November 17 2008 by Thoughtbot
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The Oxford-based James Martin Institute has announced an opening for a post as a Research Fellow in Future Studies for someone with an interest in scenario-based futures studies and scenario planning practices for public-interest futures and environmental scenarios. (Source: )
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 17 2008 by Thoughtbot
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The Convey supercomputer, to be introduced this week, promises to be simpler to program, using Intel-based field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) that can be reconfigured with different hardware "personalities" to compute problems for different industries, initially aiming at bioinformatics, computer-aided design, financial services and oil and gas exploration.Larry Smarr, director of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 17 2008 by Thoughtbot
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Invest a half-trillion dollars in R&D in AI and other areas, instead of a bailout, AI panel members at Convergence08 advised president-elect Obama. (Source: http://www.memebox.com/futureblogger/show/1289)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 17 2008 by Thoughtbot
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Stanford University AI researchers have developed software that allows anyone to insert a video or still photo on almost any planar surface in an existing video.A "3D Surface Tracker Technology" algorithm first analyzes the video, with special attention paid to the section of the scene where the new image will be placed. The color, texture and lighting of the new image are subtly altered to blend in with the surroundings. Shadows seen in the origi... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 17 2008 by Thoughtbot
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University of Upssala researchers have developed a method for detecting and manipulating quantum invisibility, using cloaking of specific terahertz frequencies. (Source: http://arxivblog.com/?p=712)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 17 2008 by Thoughtbot
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Organs that are invisible to our immune system, so they won't be rejected when they are transplanted, could be ready within 10 years, thanks to a faster way of genetically engineering pigs developed by Hammersmith Hospital in London and California Institute of Technology researchers. (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20026823.400-invisible-transplant-organs-now-in-sight.html?DCMP=OTC-rss&nsref=online-news)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 17 2008 by Thoughtbot
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A microfluidic diagnositc chip that identifies 35 proteins in 10 minutes, which normally takes multiple technicians hours to do, is being developed by Caltech and Institute for Systems Biology scientists.(James Heath)Measuring proteins in the blood can help doctors determine patients' cancer risk and monitor the health of the elderly and people with chronic diseases. (Source: http://www.technologyreview.com/biomedicine/21676/)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 17 2008 by Thoughtbot
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Hidden alien moons that could harbor life can be revealed by the wobbles of their planets, says David Kipping of University College London. (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20026825.000-planet-wobbles-could-reveal-earth-20.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 17 2008 by Thoughtbot
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"Our spam filter became self-aware and rewrote our business plan.... Do you think you really think we need to build a killer robot because our spam filter ordered you?" (Source: http://moralmachines.blogspot.com/2008/11/dilbert-and-singularity.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 16 2008 by Thoughtbot
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(PhysOrg.com) -- Medical researchers are looking at any number of new methods to get drugs to specific locations in the body. Some methods are efficient but less safe, while others are safe but often fail to deliver.
PhysOrg.com news made popular on November 15 2008 by Thoughtbot
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(University College London) Physicists at the London Center for Nanotechnology have found a way to extend the quantum lifetime of electrons by more than 5,000 percent, according to Physical Review Letters. Electrons exhibit a property called 'spin' and work like tiny magnets which can point up, down or a quantum superposition of both. The state of the spin can be used to store information and so by extending their life the research provides a sign... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular on November 14 2008 by Thoughtbot
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(PhysOrg.com) -- A University of Michigan professor has created 3-D portraits of the president-elect that are smaller than a grain of salt. He calls them "nanobamas."
PhysOrg.com news made popular on November 14 2008 by Thoughtbot
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(Harvard University) Researchers at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have demonstrated experimentally and theoretically that the surface plasmon resonances of metal nanoparticles in a periodic array can have considerably narrower spectral widths than those of isolated metal nanoparticles. Further, as the optical fields are significantly more intense in a periodic array, the method could improve the sensitivity of detecting mo... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular on November 14 2008 by Thoughtbot
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New Scientist asked six leading writers for their thoughts on the future of science fiction. It special feature also covers the latest science-fiction novels, writers to watch, and results a poll of all-time favorite sci-fi films and books. (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn14757-science-fiction-special-the-future-of-a-genre.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 14 2008 by Thoughtbot
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There's a growing number of Web sites filled with stories from people who say they are victims of mind control and stalking by gangs of government agents, drawing the concern of mental health professionals and the interest of researchers in psychology and psychiatry. (Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/13/fashion/13psych.html?pagewanted=all)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 14 2008 by Thoughtbot
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Google researchers have added sophisticated voice recognition technology to the company's search software for the Apple iPhone, with plans to offer it for other phones. (Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/14/technology/internet/14voice.html?_r=1&ref=technology&oref=slogin)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 14 2008 by Thoughtbot
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Researchers at The University of Nottingham have used carbon nanotubes to make fast non-volatile memory. (Source: http://nextbigfuture.com/2008/11/telescoping-carbon-nanotubes-can-make.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 14 2008 by Thoughtbot
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Within the next couple of years, high-bandwidth (tens of megabits per second), far-reaching wireless Internet signals will soon blanket the nation, thanks to a decision by the FCC last week to allow use of megahertz frequency bands that were previously allocated to television broadcasters. (Source: http://www.technologyreview.com/communications/21671/?a=f)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 14 2008 by Thoughtbot
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A novel drug developed by PTC Therapeutics that enables the production of normal proteins from mutated DNA might one day help people with a variety of genetic diseases. The drug has shown promise as a treatment for cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy, (Source: http://www.technologyreview.com/biomedicine/21670/)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 14 2008 by Thoughtbot
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(PhysOrg.com) -- Organic nanotubes could make rapid strides as functional nanomaterials in a new approach to nanoelectronics and biomedicine, as they can be made of easily varied and modified building blocks.
PhysOrg.com news made popular on November 14 2008 by Thoughtbot
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A Carnegie Institute of Washington team has developed a process that could lead to cheap, mass-produced, perfect diamonds of unlimited size, using chemical vapour deposition (CVD), where carbon atoms in a gas are deposited on a surface to produce diamond crystals.They got around the size limit by using microwaves to "cook" their diamonds in a hydrogen plasma at 2200 degrees C but at low pressure. Diamond size is now limited only by the size of the... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 14 2008 by Thoughtbot
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A new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley adds to the evidence that vitamin C supplements can lower concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), a biomarker for elevated risk of cardiovascular problems and diabetes.However, they also found that treatment with vitamin C is ineffective in persons whose levels of CRP are less than 1 milligram per liter. The researchers also said that for people with elevated CRP levels, ... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 14 2008 by Thoughtbot
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