As we see our world so we act, and as we act so it becomes
News on Human Progress:
...Displaying 12776 through 12800 of 18,338 news
1
vote
vote up
vote down
Yale University researchers have demonstrated that nanoimprint lithography molds can be created from more durable materials -- an advance that could make the technique commercially viable for creating denser data storage and faster microprocessors. (Source: http://www.technologyreview.com/business/22167/?a=f)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 16 2009 by Thoughtbot
1
vote
vote up
vote down
Subliminal messages do inform people's decision-making, Northwestern University researchers have found. (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20126955.600-subliminal-messages-really-do-affect-your-decisions.html?DCMP=OTC-rss&nsref=online-news)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 16 2009 by Thoughtbot
1
vote
vote up
vote down
Thanks to a fully sequenced dog genome and genetic tools that allow researchers to rapidly scan hundreds of thousands of gene mutations at once, geneticists have uncovered a handful of genes that determine coat color, variations in size, and some congenital diseases. (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/blogs/shortsharpscience/2009/02/are-smart-designer-dogs-on-the.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 16 2009 by Thoughtbot
1
vote
vote up
vote down
Jiao Tong University scientists have produced a titanium dioxide deposit derived from the Paris peacock butterfly to make a solar cell photoanode with 10 per cent higher efficiency than normal. (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20126956.400-solar-cells-feel-the-butterfly-effect.html?DCMP=OTC-rss&nsref=online-news)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 16 2009 by Thoughtbot
1
vote
vote up
vote down
"Maybe in the far future... post-human intelligence will develop hypercomputers with the processing power to simulate living things -- even entire worlds," says Martin Rees, professor of cosmology and astrophysics at the University of Cambridge. "Perhaps advanced beings could even simulate a 'universe' that goes far beyond mere patterns on a chequer-board and the best movie special effects. Their simulated universe could be as complex as the one w... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 16 2009 by Thoughtbot
1
vote
vote up
vote down
Forget reality TV. Nextgen is Augmented Reality TV: botnet replaces Judge Judy, artficial reality game (ARG) players determine real-life actions and events, new world order replaces democracy. That's the theme of the new ARG thriller Daemon. We are already steps away, with the building blocks in place now: GPS networks, pervasive botnets, top-down and bottom-up ubiquitous satellite surveillance, cams, and sensor networks. (Source: http://future... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 16 2009 by Thoughtbot
1
vote
vote up
vote down
Chemists at New York University and Nanjing University have developed a two-armed nanorobotic device that can manipulate molecules within a device built from DNA.The new, two-armed device is 150 x 50 x 8 nanometers in size and employs DNA origami, a method that uses a few hundred short DNA strands to direct a very long DNA strand to form structures that adopt any desired shape. The device enables the creation of new DNA structures, potentially ser... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 16 2009 by Thoughtbot
1
vote
vote up
vote down
Brain-implantable computers, body area networks, carbon nanotube-based therapies and drug delivery, DNA-based detectors of disease, intelligent implants, nanoelectronics for biomolecular detection, and direct brain-machine interfaces are among the state-of-the-art technologies to be explored in the 2nd Annual Unither Nanomedical & Telemedical Technology Conference, Feb. 24-27 in Orford, Quebec, Canada.Keynoted by Ray Kurzweil and microchip implant... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 16 2009 by Thoughtbot
1
vote
vote up
vote down
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) Graphene, a single-atom-thick sheet of carbon, holds remarkable promise for future nanoelectronics applications. However, whether graphene actually cuts it in industry depends upon how graphene is cut, say researchers at the University of Illinois.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on February 15 2009 by Thoughtbot
1
vote
vote up
vote down
(Northwestern University) One of the hydrogen economy's roadblocks to success is the hydrogen itself. Hydrogen needs to be purified before it can be used as fuel for fuel cells, but current methods are not very clean or efficient. Northwestern University researchers have developed a class of new porous materials, structured like honeycomb, that is very effective at separating hydrogen from complex gas mixtures. The materials exhibit the best selec... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular on February 15 2009 by Thoughtbot
1
vote
vote up
vote down
(University of Idaho) European food companies already use nanotechnology in consumer products, but few voluntarily inform consumers, said Dutch food scientist Frans Kampers of Wageningen University and Research Center Feb. 14 at the AAAS symposium "From Donuts to Drugs: Nano-Biotechnology Evolution or Revolution.""All of us as scientists are being impacted by nano-bioscience and there are many issues. The interdisciplinary aspect is just one of th... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular on February 14 2009 by Thoughtbot
1
vote
vote up
vote down
(Northwestern University) By tailoring peptide amphiphiles, small synthetic molecules developed at Northwestern University, and combining them with other molecules, Northwestern researchers can make a wide variety of structures that may provide new treatments for medical issues including spinal cord injuries, diabetes and Parkinson's disease. Combining the PA molecules with hyaluronic acid, a biopolymer found in the human body in places like joint... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular on February 14 2009 by Thoughtbot
1
vote
vote up
vote down
(DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) The smallest nano-sized silica particles used in biomedicine and engineering likely won't cause unexpected biological responses due to their size, according to work presented today. The result should allay fears that cells and tissues will react unpredictably when exposed to the finest silica nanomaterials in industrial or commercial applications. The researchers concluded this by using total surface are... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular on February 14 2009 by Thoughtbot
1
vote
vote up
vote down
(IEEE-USA) IEEE-USA President Gordon Day praises Intel for its decision to spend $7 billion over the next two years to build advanced manufacturing facilities in the United States.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on February 13 2009 by Thoughtbot
1
vote
vote up
vote down
(Georgia Institute of Technology Research News) Could hamsters help solve the world's energy crisis? Probably not, but a hamster wearing a power-generating jacket is doing its own small part to provide a new and renewable source of electricity.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on February 13 2009 by Thoughtbot
1
vote
vote up
vote down
Researchers at North Carolina State University have successfully modified a common plant virus to deliver drugs only to specific cells inside the human body without affecting surrounding tissue. These tiny "smart bombs," with built-in "cargo space" of 17 nanometers, could lead to more effective chemotherapy treatments with greatly reduced, or even eliminated, side effects. (Source: http://www.physorg.com/news153668415.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 13 2009 by Thoughtbot
1
vote
vote up
vote down
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland have demonstrated a "quantum buffer," a technique that could be used to control the data flow inside a quantum computer. (Source: http://www.physorg.com/news153681740.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 13 2009 by Thoughtbot
1
vote
vote up
vote down
Twisting radio beams into a helical shape as they are transmitted could help ease the congestion in spectrum available for wireless communication, say physicists at the Swedish Institute of Space Physics.The twisted beam can transmit huge amounts of digital data, encoded into the pitch. (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn16591-twisted-radio-beams-could-untangle-the-airwaves.html?DCMP=OTC-rss&nsref=online-news)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 13 2009 by Thoughtbot
1
vote
vote up
vote down
The first draft of the genome of a 38,000 year-old Neanderthal is complete, sequenced by Svante Paabo of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and colleagues -- the first time the entire genome of an extinct organism has been sequenced.It will allow scientists to examine Neanderthals' relationship with modern humans as never before. (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn16587-first-draft-of-neanderthal-genome-is-unveile... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 13 2009 by Thoughtbot
1
vote
vote up
vote down
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) A new ink, composed of silver nanoparticles, can be used in electronic and optoelectronic applications to create flexible, stretchable and spanning microelectrodes that carry signals from one circuit element to another. The printed microelectrodes can withstand repeated bending and stretching with minimal change in their electrical properties.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on February 12 2009 by Thoughtbot
1
vote
vote up
vote down
(DOE/Ames Laboratory) Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have shown that nanoscale, uniform lead islands on silicon are spontaneously and quickly created by unusually mobile atoms. The discovery of the "liquid-like" nanogrowth mechanism is promising for nanotechnology applications, which require fast, consistent, and efficient material growth for industrial-scale production.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on February 12 2009 by Thoughtbot
1
vote
vote up
vote down
(North Carolina State University) Researchers at North Carolina State University have successfully modified a common plant virus to deliver drugs only to specific cells inside the human body, without affecting surrounding tissue. These tiny "smart bombs" -- each one thousands of times smaller than the width of a human hair -- could lead to more effective chemotherapy treatments with greatly reduced, or even eliminated, side effects.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on February 12 2009 by Thoughtbot
1
vote
vote up
vote down
(University of Copenhagen) Researchers from Nano-Science Center, University of Copenhagen and National Center for Scientific Research, France, have developed a general method to study membrane proteins. This method can be used to screen several thousand proteins, and it will reduce the way from development to useful drugs substantially. Already now the pharmaceutical industry is interested and participate in a European consortium that is under con... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular on February 12 2009 by Thoughtbot
1
vote
vote up
vote down
Myo-inositol trispyrophosphate (ITPP) dissolved in water boosted exercise levels in mice with damaged hearts by 35%, University of Strasbourg researchers say.The finding raises hopes that the same substance can invigorate patients weakened from heart attacks by increasing the supply of oxygen to damaged cardiac muscle. (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn16564-chemical-drink-breathes-life-into-damaged-hearts.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 12 2009 by Thoughtbot
1
vote
vote up
vote down
Southern California Edison, the largest utility in California, has signed a deal to buy 1,300 megawatts of electricity (enough to power about 845,000 homes) starting in 2013, using solar power from seven immense arrays of mirrors, towers and turbines to be installed in the Mojave Desert. (Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/12/science/earth/12solar.html?ref=science)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 12 2009 by Thoughtbot
More News: Previous page
Previous
Next
Next page

Thoughtware.TV © 2006-2014
Help empower human understanding by contributing news on humanity's scientific enlightenment and technological progress