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Darpa's latest venture, called "Physical Intelligence" (PI) intends to prove mathematically that all brain activities -- reasoning, emoting, processing sights and smells -- derive from physical mechanisms, acting according to the principles of "thermodynamics in open systems."They're asking for "abiotic, self-organizing electronic and chemical systems" that display the PI principles. Darpa wants to re-envision how thought works -- and then design ... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 11 2009 by Thoughtbot
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MIT engineers Joe Paradiso and Yasuhiro Ono have applied for a patent for a system that makes confidential conversations possible in open-plan offices, and will even let a conversing group move around a room and still remain in a secure sound bubble. (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20227075.700-cone-of-silence-keeps-conversations-secret.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 11 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Launching on May 14, the European Space Agency's Planck satellite will enable us to find out what happened just fractions of a second after the big bang by examining the cosmic microwave background in exquisite detail. Cosmic microwave background (Plnck/ LBNL/SSC) (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20227073.700-planck-the-future-of-probing-the-past.html?DCMP=OTC-rss&nsref=online-news)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 11 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Owning physical media (DVDs, CDs) is antiquated, says Forrester analyst Jeremiah Owyang: take up space, not available when you want them, obsolescent formats, depreciation, and bad for environment. Better choices: iTunes, Amazon music (DRM free), stream shows live from the web, Netflix on demand. (Source: http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2009/05/10/why-physical-media-is-archaic/)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 11 2009 by Thoughtbot
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By eliminating the gene for a signaling protein called cyclophilin A (CypA) from a strain of mice, researchers at the University of Rochester and were able to provide complete protection against abdominal aortic aneurysm, a fatal event in 90 percent of cases.Inhibition of CypA also appears to have benefit in several diseases that involve blood vessels in the brain and heart, the researchers suggest. (Source: http://www.physorg.com/news161183060... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 11 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Nanocrystals that emit steady light may may open the door to dramatically less expensive and more versatile lasers, brighter LED lighting, and biological markers that track more precisely how a drug interacts with a cell, researchers at the University of Rochester, Kodak, Cornell University, and Naval Research Laboratory have found. The nanocrystals overcome the problem of sporadic light emission (blinking) from nanocrystals. "Painting" a grid of ... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 11 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Distinctive brain patterns could become the latest subject of biometric scanning after EU researchers successfully tested technology to verify ­identities for security checks.The U.S. government's IARPA (Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity) is seeking development proposals to enhance such biometric-signature technologies. (Source: http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2009/may/10/biometric-scanning-brain-security-checks)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 11 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Flu Wiki, "dedicated to sharing accurate information without scaremongering," includes links to CDC, WHO, and other key sources. (Source: )
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 09 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(Boston College) A US Department of Energy grant to enhance the nation's energy security will team Boston College physicists Zhifeng Ren and Cyril Opeil, SJ, with colleagues from MIT and Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on May 08 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Scientists and engineers now creating new technologies for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, have realized they can be used to enhance the Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys in the upcoming servicing mission.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on May 08 2009 by Thoughtbot
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The virus could infect more than a billion people by July and may not be slowed by summer temperatures in temperate countries, based on new data from Mexico and case numbers so far that reveals disturbing similarities with the last H1N1 pandemic, in 1918. (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn17100-warm-weather-may-not-halt-swine-flu.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 08 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)) The US military can now calibrate high-power laser systems, such as those intended to defuse unexploded mines, more quickly and easily thanks to a novel nanotube-coated power measurement device developed at NIST.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on May 08 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Researchers from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia have discovered important clues about why influenza is more severe in some people than it is in others. The influenza virus can paralyze the immune systems of some otherwise healthy individuals, leading to severe secondary bacterial infections, such as pneumonia. (Source: http://www.terradaily.com/reports/Scientists_Learn_Why_The_Flu_May_Turn_Deadly_999.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 08 2009 by Thoughtbot
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A fluorescent protein found in Deinococcus radiodurans, an extremophile microbe, could give scientists an unprecedented view inside living animals.The proteins, which glow with tissue-penetrating infrared light, could be used to tag cells in living animals, allowing researchers to watch real-time biological processes that have until now been hidden. (Source: http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2009/05/infraredcells/)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 08 2009 by Thoughtbot
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A new approach to electrophoretic displays being developed by Philips Research -- moving pixels horizontally instead of vertically -- may finally mean high-quality color electronic paper. Prototype in-plane electrophoretic display (Philips) (Source: http://www.technologyreview.com/computing/22627/)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 08 2009 by Thoughtbot
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The creation of large-area graphene using thin copper films may enable the manufacture of new graphene-based devices that meet the scaling requirements of the semiconductor industry, leading to faster computers and electronics, according to researchers at the University of Texas at Austin. (Source: http://www.physorg.com/news160924908.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 08 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Free will resides in a place toward the back of the brain called the parietal cortex, new research at the CNRS Cognitive Neuroscience Center in Bron, France suggests. (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn17092-possible-site-of-free-will-found-in-brain.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 08 2009 by Thoughtbot
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The World Health Organization may have inadvertently triggered a new wave of fear over the threat of a swine flu pandemic today by suggesting that up to 2 billion people could be infected if the current outbreak worsens. WHO chief Keiji Fukuda quickly noted to reporters that he was making statement based on data from past pandemics and was not a predicting what would happen with the current swine flu outbreak. (Source: http://abcnews.go.com/pri... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 08 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(University of Texas at Austin) The creation of large-area graphene using copper may enable the manufacture of new graphene-based devices that meet the scaling requirements of the semiconductor industry, leading to faster computers and electronics, according to a team of scientists and engineers at the University of Texas at Austin.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on May 07 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(University of Liverpool) Scientists at the University of Liverpool have been awarded £1.7 million ($2.55 million) to investigate how nanotechnology could be used to improve the effectiveness of pharmaceutical drugs.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on May 07 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(CSIRO Australia) The head of CSIRO's Virtual Nanoscience Laboratory, Dr. Amanda Barnard, has won the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics 2009 Young Scientist Prize in Computational Physics.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on May 07 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(Wiley-Blackwell) Korean researchers led by Tae Gwan Park and Jinwoo Cheon have developed the basis for a four-in-one agent that can detect, target, and disable tumor cells while also making them macroscopically and microscopically visible.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on May 07 2009 by Thoughtbot
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"The power of ideas to change the world is accelerating and few people grasp the implications of that fully," says futurist Ray Kurzweil."People don't think exponentially, yet exponential change applies to anything that involves measuring information content. Take genetic sequencing. When the human genome project was announced in 1990, sceptics said: 'No way you're going to do this in 15 years.' Halfway through the project the sceptics were still ... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 07 2009 by Thoughtbot
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New Scientist profiles five of the most interesting future-movers and shapers: Vernor Vinge, Walt Disney, H. G. Wells, The Club of Rome, and Alvin Toffler. (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn17082-five-futurist-visionaries-and-what-they-got-right.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 07 2009 by Thoughtbot
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The global outbreak of swine flu hovering just below the pandemic threshold could provide immunity for those already infected if the virus mutates into a more deadly form, epidemiologists say. That is what happened in 1918, when most people who fell ill with a mild Spring flu were effectively inoculated from the far more lethal strains that roared back a few months later and killed at least 40 million worldwide. (Source: http://www.physorg.com/n... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 07 2009 by Thoughtbot
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