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(DOE/Sandia National Laboratories) Sandia National Laboratories resident microencapsulation expert, Duane Schneider, is working with an Albuquerque company to use microencapsulation technology in a novel self-warming hand and body lotion.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on December 17 2008 by Thoughtbot
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A European endeavor called the Nepomuk Project plans to introduce the Semantic Web to computers in the form of a "semantic desktop."The software generates semantic information by using "crawlers" to go through a computer and annotate as many files as possible. These crawlers look through a user's address book, for example, and search for files related to the people found in there. Nepomuk can then connect a file sent by a particular person with on... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on December 17 2008 by Thoughtbot
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Georgia Institute of Technology scientists have succeeded in creating quantum memories that last for 7.2 microseconds -- more than two orders of magnitude longer than previously reported, and time enough to theoretically transmit quantum information over 1000 kilometers via photons.The qubits are stored in gas atoms, encoded into a magnetic property known as "spin." (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn16282-memory-trick-may-send-spoo... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on December 17 2008 by Thoughtbot
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(Rice University) James Tour, the inventor of the nanocar at Rice University, has been awarded the prestigious Foresight Institute Feynman Prize for experimental nanotechnology for 2008 by the California think tank dedicated to the beneficial implementation of nanotechnology.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on December 16 2008 by Thoughtbot
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(University of Southern California) It's a clear, colorless disk about 5 inches in diameter that bends and twists like a playing card, with a lattice of more than 20,000 nanotube transistors capable of high-performance electronics printed upon it using a potentially inexpensive low-temperature process.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on December 16 2008 by Thoughtbot
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It's a clear, colorless disk about 5 inches in diameter that bends and twists like a playing card, with a lattice of more than 20,000 nanotube transistors capable of high-performance electronics printed upon it using a potentially inexpensive low-temperature process.
PhysOrg.com news made popular on December 16 2008 by Thoughtbot
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University of Pittsburgh researchers have developed the first natural, nontoxic method for biodegrading carbon nanotubes, a finding that could help diminish the environmental and health concerns that mar the otherwise bright prospects of the super-strong materials commonly used in products, from electronics to plastics.
PhysOrg.com news made popular on December 16 2008 by Thoughtbot
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(Clemson University) Clemson University professor of physics and astronomy Apparao Rao has been named a Fellow of the American Physical Society. Rao was recognized for developing methods of synthesizing carbon nanotubes and for elucidating the properties of carbon nanotubes through Raman spectroscopy, a technique used in condensed-matter physics and chemistry to study vibrational, rotational and other low-frequency modes in a system.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on December 16 2008 by Thoughtbot
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(University of Pittsburgh) University of Pittsburgh researchers have developed the first natural, nontoxic method for biodegrading carbon nanotubes, a finding that could help diminish the environmental and health concerns that mar the otherwise bright prospects of the super-strong materials commonly used in products, from electronics to plastics.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on December 16 2008 by Thoughtbot
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Airborn laser battles with aircraft patrolling the skies, zapping missiles, aircraft or even satellites in low Earth orbit with invisible, ultrapowerful laser beams may become a reality soon, with the successful test of the Airborne Laser (ABL), developed by aerospace firms Boeing, Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman. (Jim Shryne/USAF) (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20026866.200-airborne-laser-lets-rip-on-first-target.html?DCMP... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on December 16 2008 by Thoughtbot
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Penn State medical researchers have found that calcium phosphate nanocomposite particles (CPNPs)encapsulating cancer-killing ceramide (effectively making ceramide soluble), killed 95 percent of human melanoma cells and were "highly effective" against human melanoma and breast cancer cells that are normally resistant to anticancer drugs. (Source: http://www.physorg.com/news148573402.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on December 16 2008 by Thoughtbot
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Artificial "injectable bone" that flows like toothpaste and hardens in the body has been invented by University of Nottingham scientists.(Regentec) (Source: http://www.cosmosmagazine.com/news/2422/injectable-liquid-bone-developed)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on December 16 2008 by Thoughtbot
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Tufts University researchers have found they can control the activity of stem cells by manipulating cellular electrical signals.When they blocked ion flow in stem cells, differentiation was suppressed, while adding chemicals that increase the voltage across cell membranes sped up their transformation. In the future, the group hopes to use this method to more precisely control stem cell differentiation when using the cells to build organs for trans... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on December 16 2008 by Thoughtbot
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Oak Ridge National Laboratory scientists have have discovered that a circuit of nanotubes can only guide a current if some of the tubes carry structural defects.Carbon nanotubes are better conductors than silicon at transmitting charge, which means nanotube circuits could boost computing speeds while reducing chip size. Structural defects, created by using a focused electron beam, could be used to precisely guide an electric current on a particula... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on December 16 2008 by Thoughtbot
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In a scene out of the movie "Minority Report," research engineers at NTT's Cyber Space Laboratories plan to use a video camera to scan travellers in a railroad station to see how many of them watch an billboard ad. (A future enhancement might be to modify the digitally controlled ad in real time, based on responses.) (Source: http://www.goodgearguide.com.au/index.php?q=article/270798/japanese_billboards_watching_back&fp=&fpid=)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on December 16 2008 by Thoughtbot
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Enhanced mobile phones will be the primary Internet device by 2020 for most people in the world, says the Pew Internet & American Life Project in a new "Future of the Internet" report. Other results from the Pew report:* 55% of experts say people will routinely interact in artificial spaces through virtual worlds and other types of augmented reality.* Voice-activation and touch will be common technology interfaces by 2020, according to nearly two-... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on December 16 2008 by Thoughtbot
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(PhysOrg.com) -- A single batch of carbon nanotubes -- molecular carbon cylinders that may one day revolutionize electronics engineering -- often includes more than 100 types of tubes, each with different optical and electrical properties. Individual electrical measurements of the molecules typically require such slow and expensive methods as electron-beam lithography.
PhysOrg.com news made popular on December 15 2008 by Thoughtbot
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Researchers in Pennsylvania are reporting for the first time that nanoparticles 1/5,000 the diameter of a human hair encapsulating an experimental anticancer agent, kill human melanoma and drug-resistant breast cancer cells growing in laboratory cultures. The discovery could lead to the development of a new generation of anti-cancer drugs that are safer and more effective than conventional chemotherapy agents, the scientists suggest. The research ... More
PhysOrg.com news made popular on December 15 2008 by Thoughtbot
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(PhysOrg.com) -- A carbon nanotube-coated "smart yarn" that conducts electricity could be woven into soft fabrics that detect blood and monitor health, engineers at the University of Michigan have demonstrated.
PhysOrg.com news made popular on December 15 2008 by Thoughtbot
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(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT researchers have created a microbial ecosystem smaller than a stick of gum that sheds new light on the plankton-eat-plankton world at the bottom of the aquatic food chain. The work, reported in the January print issue of American Naturalist, may lead to better predictions of marine microbes' global-scale influence on climate.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on December 15 2008 by Thoughtbot
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Researchers at MIT have found that carbon nanotubes wrapped with a small piece of DNA can serve as highly sensitive biological sensors for detecting single molecules in living cells in real time, at a sensitivity that far exceeds that of fluorescent dyes, the standard tool for molecular imaging. The sensors could eventually be used to monitor the effectiveness of chemotherapy drugs, track molecular interactions in cells, and test for low levels of... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on December 15 2008 by Thoughtbot
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M2Z Networks wants to blanket the nation with a free wireless broadband network to ensure all Americans have access to basic high-speed Internet connections. The application to the FCC is on hold until the Obama administration takes over. (Source: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/12/14/AR2008121401282.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on December 15 2008 by Thoughtbot
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MIT engineers have developed carbon nanotubes into sensors for cancer drugs and other DNA-damaging agents inside living cells.
PhysOrg.com news made popular on December 14 2008 by Thoughtbot
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It's hard to study something with any rigor if the subject can't be produced uniformly and efficiently. Researchers who study double-walled carbon nanotubes -- nanomaterials with promising technological applications -- find themselves in just this predicament.
PhysOrg.com news made popular on December 14 2008 by Thoughtbot
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(Northwestern University) It's hard to study something with any rigor if the subject can't be produced uniformly and efficiently. Researchers who study double-walled carbon nanotubes find themselves in just this predicament. The problem is that current techniques for synthesizing double-walled carbon nanotubes also produce unwanted single- and multi-walled nanotubes. Northwestern University researchers now offer a clever solution: They used a tech... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular on December 14 2008 by Thoughtbot
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