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(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT researchers are developing the basic principles of nano-origami, a new technique that allows engineers to fold nanoscale materials into simple 3-D structures. The tiny folded materials could be used as motors and capacitors, potentially leading to better computer memory storage, faster microprocessors and new nanophotonic devices.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on February 27 2009 by Thoughtbot
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As with traumatic injury, the brain may have the ability to reprogram itself to compensate for problems with key neurotransmitters such as serotonin and dopamine, say study investigators at York College and City University of New York. The finding may open the doors to entirely new lines of research and treatments for a wide range of brain disorders, including addiction, depression, Parkinson (Source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/0... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 27 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Rsearchers from Hewlett-Packard Laboratories have fabricated and demonstrated a hybrid circuit with a memory resistor (or "memristor") combined with a transistor circuit for the first time. The circuit can also alter its own programming.A circuit containing both memristors and transistors could provide enhanced functionality with fewer components, minimizing chip area and power consumption. (Source: http://www.physorg.com/news154865950.html)... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 27 2009 by Thoughtbot
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An affordable version of a tripod robot called Gigapan developed at Carnegie Mellon University uses motors to capture a scene with a grid of hundreds or thousands of images with an ordinary digital camera set to full zoom. Photo stitching software then combines them into a single super-detailed image containing billions of pixels, called a gigapan, which can be uploaded to a dedicated site where users are able zoom right into the images. (Source... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 27 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Five-minute films produced for mobile phones are the future, bringing them to a wide audience, says actor Kevin Spacey. (Source: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/7908414.stm)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 27 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Russ Wilcox, co-founder and CEO of E Ink, the company behind the low-power, high-contrast "electronic paper" screen on the Kindle 2 and e-paper: E-paper has taken 12 years and $150 million to develop. What we've got here is a technology that could be saving the [global print media] $80 billion a year." 2010 will be a big year for flexible displays. And then at the end of 2010, you will start to see improvements in the ink. We will have a whiter wh... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 27 2009 by Thoughtbot
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BioNanomatrix is pursuing what may be the key to personalized medicine: sequencing technology so fast and cheap that an entire human genome can be read in eight hours for $100 or less. (Source: http://www.technologyreview.com/biomedicine/22112/)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 27 2009 by Thoughtbot
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MIT researchers are developing the basic principles of "nano-origami," a new technique that allows engineers to fold nanoscale materials into simple 3-D structures. The tiny folded materials could be used as motors and capacitors, potentially leading to better computer memory storage, faster microprocessors and new nanophotonic devices. (Source: http://www.physorg.com/news154796282.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 27 2009 by Thoughtbot
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University of Michigan and other researchers are honing techniques for growing carefully structured arrays of high-quality carbon nanotubes, which could be the basis of new energy-storage devices and chip-cooling systems.(John Hart) (Source: http://www.technologyreview.com/computing/22095/?a=f)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 27 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Singularity 101 with Vernor Vinge, Space Solar, First Steps Toward Post Scarcity, Building Your Perfect Memory, Hacking The Economy, and Nanobots in the Bloodstream are among the articles in the impressive new Spring 2009 issue of the online trendsetting edge-culture magazine H+. (Source: )
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 26 2009 by Thoughtbot
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There has been a flurry of interest in nanobots over the past week, casting quite a wide net that ranges from Nadrian Seeman's experimental lab work to Ray Kurzweil's hopeful dreams for the far future, says Foresight Institute president J. Storrs Hall. (Source: http://www.foresight.org/nanodot/?p=2970)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 26 2009 by Thoughtbot
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The current nano buzz includes four innovations:1. New research in using conductive nanomaterials for neuroengineering applications proposes carbon nanotubes as ideal probes for bidirectional interfaces in neuroprosthetics and as nanotools to endogenously (re)engineer single-neuron excitability and network connectivity.2 Recent advance in seeded growth as the ultimate approach to producing metal nanocrystals with precisely controlled sizes, shapes... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 26 2009 by Thoughtbot
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University of Nebraska-Lincoln researchers have created nanoscale devices based on connecting sharp-tipped electrodes with individually self-aligned carbon nanotubes. Scanning electron microscope image of electrodes (inset) and single-walled carbon nanotube bridge structureThe finding could lead to new applications in devices such as biosensors, light emitters, photon sensors, tiny molecular motors and memory cells. (Source: http://www.physorg.c... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 26 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Researchers from Queensland University of Technology and the University of South Florida have investigated the quantum nature of word associations and presented a simplified quantum model of a mental lexicon.They view quantum theory as an abstract framework for developing models of "non-separability" (of which quantum entanglement is a physical manifestation) in a variety of domains including cognition.This kind of research is an example of an eme... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 26 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Microsoft's TechFest this year included 37 demos, ranging from gesture-based interfaces to augmented reality and better image search. (Source: http://www.technologyreview.com/blog/editors/23023/)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 26 2009 by Thoughtbot
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University of Oxford researchers have come up with a way for map-building robots to accurately recognize places they have been before, even when objects have moved or are approached from a new angle.Their FabMap software tackles those problems by having a robot assign a visual "vocabulary" of up to a thousand individual "words" for each scene, every two seconds. That means when the robot revisits a scene that now lacks, say, a bicycle, it notes a... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 26 2009 by Thoughtbot
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People lose weight if they lower calories -- it doesn't matter which diet, according to the largest-ever controlled study of weight-loss methods, published Wednesday in The New England Journal of Medicine. (Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/26/health/nutrition/26diet.html?ref=us)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 26 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)) Researchers at NIST and The Johns Hopkins University have constructed a unique tool for exploring the properties of promising new materials with unprecedented sensitivity and speed, potentially allowing them to identify quickly those most useful for nanotechnology and industrial applications.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on February 25 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Friction is a force that affects any application where moving parts come into contact; the more surface contact there is, the stronger the force. At the nanoscale -- mere billionths of a meter -- friction can wreak havoc on tiny devices made from only a small number of atoms or molecules. With their high surface-to-volume ratio, nanomaterials are especially susceptible to the forces of friction.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on February 25 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(Vanderbilt University) A team of Vanderbilt scientists have invented the world's smallest version of the periscope and are using it to look at cells and other microorganisms from several sides at once.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on February 25 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(University of Oregon) Next time you have an unlucky encounter with a crab's pincers, consider that the claw tips may be reinforced with bromine-rich biomaterial 1.5 times harder than acrylic glass and extremely fracture resistant, says a University of Oregon scientist.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on February 25 2009 by Thoughtbot
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A prototype chip built by D-Wave Systems is designed to handle 128 qubits of information, more than any previous device. (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20126965.600-most-powerful-ever-quantum-chip-undergoing-tests.html?DCMP=OTC-rss&nsref=online-news)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 25 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Microsoft researchers have demonstrated software that can superimpose computer-generated information in real time on top of a digitized view of the real world, which could add another dimension to future smart phones. (Source: http://www.technologyreview.com/computing/22218/?a=f)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 25 2009 by Thoughtbot
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IBM fellow Stuart Parkin has developed an entirely new way to store information: "racetrack memory," a memory chip with the huge storage capacity of a magnetic hard drive, the durability of electronic flash memory, and speed superior to both. The key is an array of U-shaped magnetic nanowires, arranged vertically like trees in a forest. (Source: http://www.technologyreview.com/computing/22115/)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 25 2009 by Thoughtbot
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A computerized kiosk under development at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) can take a patient's medical history, weight, pulse, blood pressure, and other vital signs, and even perform simple blood tests for glucose and cholesterol. Physicians hope that the device will one day bring relief to the overburdened healthcare system, and allow doctors to intervene earlier in chronic disease. (Source: http://www.technologyreview.com/biomedicine/2221... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on February 25 2009 by Thoughtbot
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