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(University of California - San Diego) The University of California, San Diego, in collaboration with UC Davis will use a two-year, $700,000 grant from the California Energy Commission to expand the development and use of solar energy in the state.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on April 15 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(University of California - Santa Barbara) Two government funding agencies are putting $6.1 million into a pair of research projects aimed at utilizing diamond for quantum communication processing. UCSB is leading the charge on both efforts, due to dramatic developments in quantum physics in the past decade at the university.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on April 15 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(Brown University) Physicists at Brown University have developed a novel procedure to map a person's genome. They report in the journal Nanotechnology the first experiment to move a DNA chain through a nanopore using magnets. The approach is promising because it allows multiple segments of a DNA strand to be read simultaneously and accurately.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on April 15 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(Rice University) Scientists at Rice University have found a simple way to unzip carbon nanotubes into ribbons in bulk to create basic elements for aircraft, flat-screen TVs, electronics and other products that incorporate sheets of tough, electrically conductive material.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on April 15 2009 by Thoughtbot
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An international team of scientists has developed a way to train molecules to line up neatly on the surface of water in thin, tissue-like layers called nanofilms. This technique should allow biochemists to better see and study the molecules and may lead to a new generation of molecular electronics and ultra-thin materials only one molecule thick. It may also pave the way for new kinds of self-assembling nanomaterials. (Source: http://www.physorg... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on April 15 2009 by Thoughtbot
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A study by McMaster University researchers reaffirms the benefits of a Mediterranean diet -- rich in vegetables, nuts, whole grains, fish and olive oil -- compared to a Western diet, heavy on processed meats, red meat, refined grains and high-fat dairy. (Source: http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5hFVkeLUPfZVTsvMIvfnk7U1KwPzwD97HPJOO2)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on April 15 2009 by Thoughtbot
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A Stanford University School of Medicine team has for the first time used specially designed dye-containing nanoparticles to simultaneously monitor changes in two intracellular proteins that play crucial roles in the development of cancer. Successful development of the new technique may improve scientists' ability to diagnose cancers -- for example, by determining how aggressive tumors' constituent cells are -- and to eventually separate living, b... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on April 15 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Daniel Kish lost his sight in infancy, but taught himself to echolocate with bat-like clicks and hand claps. (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20227031.400-echo-vision-the-man-who-sees-with-sound.html?full=true)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on April 15 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Teriparatide (Forteo), a drug that boosts the body's production of stem cells appears to "jump-start" the bone-healing process to a point that older adults' bones heal as fast as young people's, research at University of Rochester Medical Center suggests. (Source: http://www.forbes.com/feeds/hscout/2009/04/14/hscout626043.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on April 15 2009 by Thoughtbot
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The crust of neutron stars is 10 billion times stronger than steel, according to new simulations by Los Alamos National Laboratory. That makes the surface of these ultra-dense stars tough enough to support long-lived bulges that could produce gravitational waves detectable by experiments on Earth. (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn16948-star-crust-is-10-billion-times-stronger-than-steel.html?DCMP=OTC-rss&nsref=online-news)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on April 15 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(Case Western Reserve University) A watery, mud-like substance has hit pay dirt for Case Western Reserve University engineering professor David Schiraldi and his research group. The researchers have created a line of patented foam-like and environmentally friendly polymers, called clay aerogel composites that can take on the shape and size of any container that can hold water -- from ice cube trays to rubber ducky molds to clam-shell packaging mol... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular on April 14 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Pairing sensors with Twitter leads some to think Twitter could be used to send home security alerts or tell doctors when a patient's blood sugar or heart rate climbs too high. In the aggregate, such real-time data streams could aid medical researchers.Already, doctors use Twitter to ask for help and share information about procedures, while companies like Dell, Starbucks and Microsoft are using it for customer service and market research. (Sourc... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on April 14 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Chair-related ailments include increased risk of blood clots and back pain. Remedies include a treadmill desk, lumbar roll, correct sitting position, posture, and exercises. (Source: http://www.physorg.com/news158569318.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on April 14 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Kansas State University engineers have developed a graphene-based DNA sensor and a have found a way for graphene with tethered antibodies to wrap itself around an individual bacterium, which could be used to produce electricity. (Source: http://www.physorg.com/news158850916.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on April 14 2009 by Thoughtbot
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A study by the Brain and Creativity Institute at the University of Southern California raises questions about the emotional cost -- particularly for the developing brain -- of heavy reliance on a rapid stream of news snippets obtained through television, online feeds, or social networks such as Twitter."If things are happening too fast, you may not ever fully experience emotions about other people's psychological states and that would have implica... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on April 14 2009 by Thoughtbot
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McGill University researchers have succeeded in manufacturing custom-designed nanotubes by incorporating synthetic metallic molecules into DNA strands that are programmed to assemble into complex one- two- and three-dimensional structures. The resulting nanotubes offer great potential for the construction of metal nanowires of different geometries, for encapsulation and selective release of drugs near the site of diseased cells, for example. (So... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on April 14 2009 by Thoughtbot
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A U of Waterloo engineering research team has developed the world's first flying micro-robot capable of manipulating objects for microscale applications. It hovers by levitating, powered by a magnetic field, and dexterously manipulates objects with magnets attached to micro-grippers, remotely controlled by a laser-focusing beam.It can be used for micromanipulation, a technique that enables precise positioning of micro objects. Applications of such... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on April 14 2009 by Thoughtbot
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A wearable system that lets a user control a computer using eye movements, and devices that sync when they touch to show related photos are among the odder inventions demoed at the Computer-Human Interaction Conference in Boston last week. (Source: http://www.technologyreview.com/blog/editors/23357/)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on April 14 2009 by Thoughtbot
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California's Pacific Gas & Electric has asked the California Public Utilities Commission for permission to buy 200 megawatts of electricity from Solaren's orbiting power plant, which would beam electricity back to Earth by 2016.(Mafic Studios, Inc.) (Source: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2009/04/13/MN7S171PSL.DTL)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on April 14 2009 by Thoughtbot
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The United Arab Emirates on Tuesday claimed the birth of a cloned camel in Dubai this month, after more than five years of work by scientists at the Camel Reproduction Centre and the Central Veterinary Research Laboratory. (Source: http://www.physorg.com/news158906603.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on April 14 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute) The speed at which heat moves between two materials touching each other is a potent indicator of how strongly they are bonded to each other, according to a new study by researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Additionally, the study shows that this flow of heat from one material to another, in this case one solid and one liquid, can be dramatically altered by "painting" a thin atomic layer between materi... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular on April 13 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(Lehigh University) Researchers at Lehigh University, IBM and the Ioffe Institute have developed a way to release heat trapped inside billions of tiny semiconductor electronic circuits and channel it into the substrate, which is larger and can be more easily cooled. Their method exploits the electron scattering that occurs in non-suspended carbon nanotube transistors. This scattering causes a wave, or surface polariton, which is particularly stron... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular on April 13 2009 by Thoughtbot
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The ear makes noises (otoacoustic emissions), at a level only detectable by supersensitive microphones.If those noises prove unique to each individual, it could boost the security of call-center and telephone-banking transactions and reduce the need for people to remember numerous identification codes. (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20227035.200-our-ears-may-have-builtin-passwords.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on April 13 2009 by Thoughtbot
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A supercapacitor -- a device that can unleash large amounts of charge very quickly -- has been created using printing technology for the first time. The advance by a team led by UCLA researchers will pave the way for "printed" power supplies that could be useful as gadgets become thinner, lighter and even flexible. (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn16939-printed-supercapacitor-could-feed-powerhungry-gadgets.html?DCMP=OTC-rss&nsref=o... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on April 13 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Trapping light inside the nanoscale pores of thin-film solar cells coated with titanium dioxide-spiked diatom shells could help triple the electrical output of experimental, dye-sensitized solar cells, according to researchers at Oregon State University and Portland State University.The pattern of intricate nanoscale features on the diatoms boosted the photovoltaic surface area available and also trapped incident light inside the pores. (Source:... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on April 13 2009 by Thoughtbot
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