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News on Human Progress:
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AI researchers have taught computers to play a wide range of strategic games well enough to beat the best human players, including chess, poker, and checkers. The next generation of bots will be general game players (GGPs), which can learn the rules of any game and then figure out how to play it. (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn17145-nine-games-computers-are-ruining-for-humanity.html?DCMP=OTC-rss&nsref=online-news)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 19 2009 by Thoughtbot
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The probability that the universe it flat may only be 67 percent because WMAP observations of the density of matter and dark energy in the early universe may have been misinterpreted, says Joseph Silk at the University of Oxford and colleagues, based on a new study. The universe could also be positively curved (like the surface of a sphere) or negatively curved (saddle-shaped). (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20227084.500-flat-un... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 19 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Comics/graphics novels worth reading are suggested in a new blog by Max More, co-founder of the Extropy Institute. (Source: http://strategicphilosophy.blogspot.com/2009/05/comics-of-transhumanist-interest.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 18 2009 by Thoughtbot
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A lithium-sulfur battery that can store and deliver more than three times the power of conventional lithium ion batteries has been developed by University Of Waterloo researchers. The battery overcomes cathode contact problems with sulphur by using mesoporous carbon microfibers to ensure uniform filling of voids. (Source: http://www.nanowerk.com/news/newsid=10689.php)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 18 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(Northwestern University) A research team at Northwestern University has demonstrated use of a Nanofountain Probe that can precisely deliver tiny doses of drug-carrying nanomaterials to individual cells.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on May 18 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council) An NSERC-funded lab at the University of Waterloo has laid the groundwork for a lithium battery that can store and deliver more than three times the power of conventional lithium ion batteries.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on May 18 2009 by Thoughtbot
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The coming generation of space telescopes will for the first time be capable of detecting "biosignatures" (such as the presence of oxygen) in the light from planets orbiting other stars. (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20227083.800-telescopes-poised-to-spot-airbreathing-aliens.html?DCMP=OTC-rss&nsref=online-news)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 18 2009 by Thoughtbot
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A highly porous, sponge-like material whose mechanical properties closely resemble those of biological soft tissues has been developed by Australian and Korean researchers.The new concept uses DNA strands as a matrix; the strands completely "wrap" the scaffold-forming carbon nanotubes in the presence of an ionic liquid, networking them to form a gel. This gel can be spun: just as silk and synthetic fibers can be wet-spun for textiles, the gel can ... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 18 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Emotions are represented by distinct spatial signatures in the brain that can be detected with fMRI, University of Geneva scientists have found. (Source: http://www.physorg.com/news161528185.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 18 2009 by Thoughtbot
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E Ink Corporation will demonstrate a color version of its e-paper on 31 May, with products expected by the end of 2010. (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20227086.100-new-ereaders-will-end-black-and-white-era.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 18 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Fujitsu has developed has developed the world's fastest (128 Gigabits/sec.) supercomputer CPU prototype, beating the current record, held by Intel Corp., by 2.5 times.Fujitsu Venus (PC Watch) (Source: http://www.physorg.com/news161600187.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 18 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Project LifeLike aims to to create avatars that are as realistic as possible, including 3-D measurements of a person's form and of movements, natural language, and automated knowledge update and refinement. The project is a collaboration between the Intelligent Systems Laboratory at the University of Central Florida and the Electronic Visualization Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Chicago. (Source: http://www.physorg.com/news16163009... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 18 2009 by Thoughtbot
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An efficient system for delivering siRNA into primary cells to allow for future personalized cancer treatment has been developed by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine.PTD-DRBD fusion protein (Dowdy Lab/UC San Diego) (Source: http://www.physorg.com/news161750021.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 18 2009 by Thoughtbot
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A solar-powered micro-machine that can carry out basic sensing tasks and indirectly control the movement of a swarm of magnetically sensitive bacteria, using an external MRI machine, has been developed by researchers at the Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal. Micro-machines could one day be used for medical purposes. (Source: http://www.technologyreview.com/blog/editors/23533/)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 18 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Scribd will introduce on Monday a way for anyone to upload a document to the Web (encrypted or not), charge for it, and keep 80 percent of the revenue. (Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/18/technology/start-ups/18download.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 18 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Highly connected cities with smart grids, widely available wireless access, social networks, and sustainable data centers are well within reach. (Source: http://www.computerworld.com/action/article.do?command=printArticleBasic&taxonomyName=Government&articleId=9133040&taxonomyId=13)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 18 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Soya plants grown near Chernobyl produced proteins involved in defending cells from heavy metal and radiation damage, Slovak Academy of Sciences researchers have found. The research could help scientists engineer radiation-resistant plants, useful to future interplanetary travellers, who may need to grow crops to withstand space radiation. (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn17136)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 18 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(Washington University in St. Louis) Of the 92 naturally occurring elements, add another to the list of those that are superconductors. James S. Schilling, Ph.D., professor of physics in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, and Mathew Debessai, Ph.D., -- Schilling's doctoral student at the time -- discovered that europium becomes superconducting at 1.8 K (-456 °F) and 80 GPa (790,000 atmospheres) of pressure, making it the 53rd ... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular on May 15 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(University of Houston) The inexpensive plastic now used to manufacture CDs and DVDs may soon be put to use in improving the integrity of electronics in aircraft, computers and iPhones. Thanks to a pair of grants from the US Air Force, a team of UH researchers have demonstrated ultra-high electrical conductive properties in these plastics. The findings are chronicled in a recent issue of the Journal of Applied Physics.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on May 15 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Electrons behave like they don't have mass in graphene, explaining why electrons are more than 100 times more mobile in graphene than in silicon, Georgia Institute of Technology and the National Institute of Standards and Technology reseachers have found.Graphene's exotic behaviors present intriguing prospects for future technologies, including high-speed, graphene-based electronics that might replace today's silicon-based integrated circuits and ... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 15 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Spatial signatures of emotion in the primary auditory cortex (PAC) -- an area of the temporal lobes at the side of the brain (responsible for the sensation of sound) -- have been identified by researchers at the University Medical Center of Geneva, Switzerland. The findings might help researchers unravel where our emotional response goes wrong in various psychiatric disorders such as depression and schizophrenia, and also in autism. (Source: htt... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 15 2009 by Thoughtbot
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An organic light-emitting diode (OLED) with the potential to produce the same quality of white light as incandescent bulbs, but with power efficiencies much better than even fluorescent lighting, has been developed at the Institute for Applied Photophysics, in Dresden, Germany. The OLED exhibits efficiencies of 90 lumens per watt and shows potential to go up to 124 lumens per watt, compared to 10 to 17 lumens per watt for incandescent bulbs and 60... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 15 2009 by Thoughtbot
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A tiny (smaller than a grain of rice) injectable implant designed to treat chronic pain and other neurological disorders has been developed by MicroTransponder using RFID technology. (MicroTransponder)Radio waves transmitted by the external coil generate a magnetic field in the internal coil, which powers the electrodes. (Source: http://www.technologyreview.com/biomedicine/22657/)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on May 15 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(Washington University in St. Louis) Material scientists at Washington University in St. Louis have developed a technique for a bimetallic fuel cell catalyst that is efficient, robust and two to five times more effective than commercial catalysts. The novel technique eventually will enable a cost effective fuel cell technology, which has been waiting in the wings for decades, and should give a boost for cleaner use of fuels worldwide.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on May 14 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)) Applying innovative measurement techniques, researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology and the National Institute of Standards and Technology have directly measured the unusual energy spectrum of graphene, a technologically promising, two-dimensional form of carbon that has tantalized and puzzled scientists since its discovery in 2004.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on May 14 2009 by Thoughtbot
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