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Results of massively parallel cortical simulations of a cat cortex, with 1.5 billion neurons and 9 trillion synapses, running on Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Dawn Blue Gene/P supercomputer, will be presented today at SC09 in Portland. "The simulations, which incorporate phenomenological spiking neurons, individual learning synapses, axonal delays, and dynamic synaptic channels, exceed the scale of the cat cortex, marking the dawn of a n... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 18 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(Cornell University) With a bit of leverage, Cornell researchers have used a very tiny beam of light with as little as 1 milliwatt of power to move a silicon structure up to 12 nanometers. That's enough to completely switch the optical properties of the structure from opaque to transparent.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on November 17 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(Vanderbilt University) First, it was the soccer-ball-shaped molecules dubbed buckyballs. Then it was the cylindrically shaped nanotubes. Now, the hottest new material in physics and nanotechnology is graphene: a remarkably flat molecule made of carbon atoms arranged in hexagonal rings much like molecular chicken wire.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on November 17 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(New Jersey Institute of Technology) Even if you are not a cook, you might have wondered why a pinch of flour (or any small particles) thrown into a bowl of water will disperse in a dramatic fashion, radiating outward as if it was exploding. Pushpendra Singh, Ph.D., a mechanical engineering professor at NJIT who has studied and written about the phenomenon, has not only thought about it, but can explain why.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on November 17 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(Elsevier) Monetary gain stimulates activity in the brain. Even the mere possibility of receiving a reward is known to activate an area of the brain called the striatum.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on November 17 2009 by Thoughtbot
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An awesome 3D equivalent of the Mandelbrot fractal has been developed. (Source: )
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 17 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Betavoltaics, batteries that harvest energy from the nuclear decay of isotopes to produce very low levels of current and last for decades without needing to be replaced, are being developed by Widetronix. (Source: http://www.technologyreview.com/energy/23959/)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 17 2009 by Thoughtbot
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The U.S. Department of Energy has begun holding workshops on building a system that's 1,000 times more powerful than today's top supercomputer (Jaquar's 2.3 petaflops): an exascale (10^18 calculations per second) system, which would likely arrive around the year 2018. Exascale systems will be needed for high-resolution climate models, bio energy products and smart grid development as well as fusion energy design.The Energy Department, which is re... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 17 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Building an exascale supercomputer that can deliver a billion billion (10^18) calculations per second is going to force designers to change the way they think about putting these supercomputers together. Graphics processors (GPUs) are the first step in that process, although more esoteric technologies may emerge. (Source: http://www.nytimes.com/external/gigaom/2009/11/16/16gigaom-how-will-we-keep-supercomputing-super-85018.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 17 2009 by Thoughtbot
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The New Oxford American Dictionary has announced its Word Of The Year for 2009: unfriend (v. To remove someone as a "friend" on a social networking site such as Facebook). (Source: http://blogs.computerworld.com/15108/unfriend_the_word_of_the_year_apparently)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 17 2009 by Thoughtbot
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YouTube has signed up NPR, Politico, The Huffington Post and The San Francisco Chronicle for YouTube Direct, a new method for managing video submissions from citizen journalists. (Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/17/business/media/17youtube.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 17 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Up to 1000 galaxy clusters have found to be streaming at up to 1000 kilometers per second towards one particular part of the cosmos, a possible sign that other universes are out there. (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20427345.000-mystery-dark-flow-extends-towards-edge-of-universe.html?DCMP=OTC-rss&nsref=online-news)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 17 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Google and a coalition of authors and publishers are hoping a second draft of a legal settlement will clear the way through a thicket of copyright laws to let Google build the library of the future. (Source: http://www.wired.com/epicenter/2009/11/google-books-settlement/)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 17 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(University of California - Los Angeles) Titanium dioxide nanoparticles, found in everything from cosmetics to sunscreen to paint to vitamins, caused systemic genetic damage in mice, according to a comprehensive study conducted by researchers at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on November 16 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(Arizona State University) Arizona State University has been awarded nearly $3 million in federal stimulus funds from the National Institutes of Health. ASU professors Stuart Lindsay and Paul Westerhoff will lead a pair of two-year, innovative projects designed to tackle challenges in the fields of rapid DNA sequencing and the potential health risks of nanotechnology.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on November 16 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(New Jersey Institute of Technology) Even if you are not a cook, you might have wondered why a pinch of flour (or any small particles) thrown into a bowl of water will disperse in a dramatic fashion, radiating outward as if it was exploding. Pushpendra Singh, PhD, a mechanical engineering professor at NJIT who has studied and written about the phenomenon, has not only thought about it, but can explain why.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on November 16 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(Yale University) A team led by Yale University scientists has developed a new approach to studying how immune cells chase down bacteria in our bodies. They used holographic optical tweezers to guide "artificial bacteria" -- microparticles that mimic bacteria by giving off a chemical "scent," stimulating immune cells to respond. By controlling the chemical patterns produced, they were able to study how immune cells respond to and interact with the... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular on November 16 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Over the last week, Singularity University has been holding an Executive Program with the goal of preparing executives for the "imminent disruption and opportunities resulting from exponentially accelerating technologies." (Source: http://www.techcrunch.com/2009/11/13/singularity-university-executive-program-ray-kurzweils-opening-address/)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 16 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Science Daily reports two important tips for improving cardiac arrest victims' chances of survival: - Use continuous chest compressions without stopping for mouth-to-mouth breathing (Continuous Chest Compression-CPR Improved Cardiac Arrest Survival in Arizona)- Cool the brain: RhinoChill, for use by emergency medical technicians, is approved for marketing in Europe (Early Cooling in Cardiac Arrest May Improve Survival) (Source: )
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 16 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Georgia Tech scientists have developed microscopic polymer beads that can deliver an antioxidant enzyme made naturally by the body into the heart, reducing the number of dying cells and resulting in improved heart function in rats.The enzyme in the particles, called superoxide dismutase (SOD), soaks up toxic free radicals produced when cells are deprived of blood during a heart attack. (Source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091115... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 16 2009 by Thoughtbot
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European researchers in the MESH project have created the first integrated semantic search platform that integrates text, video and audio. The platform can search annotated files from any type of media -- photographs, videos, sound recordings, text, document scans -- using optical character recognition, automated speech recognition and automatic annotation of movies and photographs that track salient concepts. (Source: http://www.sciencedaily.co... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 16 2009 by Thoughtbot
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The action figures in toy stores for James Cameron's forthcoming Avatar film add an an "augmented reality" feature to toys, the first to add artificial reality to a product. (Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/15/magazine/15FOB-consumed-t.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 16 2009 by Thoughtbot
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The Jaguar Cray supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has become the world's most powerful supercomputer, at 1.75 petaflops per second, edging out the IBM Roadrunner system at the U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, which has slowed slightly to 1.04 petaflops per second. The newest version of the TOP500 list, which is issued twice yearly, will be formally presented on Tuesday, Nov. 17, at the SC09 Con... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 16 2009 by Thoughtbot
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The LCROSS probe discovered the equivalent of a dozen 2-gallon buckets of water in the form of ice, in a crater at the lunar south pole. Having that store of water on the moon could be a boon to possible future lunar camps. In addition to a source of drinking water, lunar water ice could be broken into its constituent hydrogen and oxygen atoms, ultimately to be used in rocket fuel. (Source: http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/091113-moon-wate... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 16 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Residents of Second Life have spent one billion hours in this digital world. Now founder Philip Rosedale has plans to push the concept much further in a new virtual venture."My expectation is we will see a web-scale usage fairly soon, meaning 1 billion people," says Rosedale. "I think the total GDP of virtual worlds will catch up with real-world GDP over the next 20 to 30 years." (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20427347.200-philip... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 16 2009 by Thoughtbot
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