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News on Human Progress:
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"It's not inconceivable we’ll reach a point that machines do match human intelligence," said Intel CTO Justin Rattner, referring to the concept of the technological Singularity. Rattner said the fundamental technologies behind a future exaflop machine could be demonstrated by the middle of next decade, and -- depending on government investment -- the first exaflop machines could become operational in the second half of the decade,... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on September 23 2009 by Thoughtbot
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In his new book Whole Earth Discipline, Stewart Brand defends genetic engineering, nuclear power, and other longtime nemeses of the green left as good for the planet. (Source: http://www.wired.com/techbiz/people/magazine/17-10/ff_smartlist_brand#)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on September 23 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) After learning how DNA interacts with the novel nanomaterial graphene, researchers propose a DNA-graphene nanoscaffold be used as a biosensor to diagnose diseases, detect toxins in tainted food and detect pathogens in biological weapons, among other applications.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on September 22 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)) Diamonds, it has long been said, are a girl's best friend. But a research team including a physicist from NIST has recently found that the gems might turn out to be a patient's best friend as well.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on September 22 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)) Inventing a useful new tool for creating chemical reactions between single molecules, scientists at NIST have employed microfluidics to make microdroplets that each contain a single molecules of interest. By combining this new microfluidic with techniques to merge multiple droplets, the research may ultimately lead to new information on the structure and function of important organic material... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular on September 22 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)) A research team at NIST studying sugar-coated nanoparticles for use as a possible cancer therapy has uncovered a delicate balancing act that makes the particles more effective than conventional thinking says they should be. Just like individuals in a crowd respecting other people's personal space, the particles work because they get close together, but not too close.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on September 22 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)) NIST has issued a new ruler, and even for an organization that routinely deals in superlatives, it sets some records. Designed to be the most accurate commercially available 'meter stick' for the nano world, the new measuring tool boasts uncertainties below a femtometer. That's 0.000 000 000 000 001 meter, or roughly the size of a neutron.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on September 22 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) Researchers have found that graphene, sheets of carbon one atom thick, improves the performance of titanium dioxide as a lithium battery electrode.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on September 22 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(Purdue University) Understanding precisely how fluid boils in tiny "microchannels" has led to formulas and models that will help engineers design systems to cool high-power electronics in electric and hybrid cars, aircraft, computers and other devices.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on September 22 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council) Scientists have uncovered what happens to biomimetic nanoparticles when they enter human cells. They found that the important proteins that make up the outer layer of these nanoparticles are degraded by an enzyme called cathepsin L. Scientists now have to take this phenomenon into account and overcome this process to ensure the exciting field of nanomedicine can progress.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on September 22 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Researchers at the University of Edinburgh have discovered how DNA transposition, in which shifted genes have a significant effect on the behavior of neighboring genes, can enable the immune system to target infection more effectively. (Source: http://www.physorg.com/news172754474.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on September 22 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Carbon nanotubes could be formed into tiny springs capable of storing as much energy, pound for pound, as state-of-the-art lithium-ion batteries (potentially more durably and reliably), with 1000 times more energy for their weight than steel springs. (Source: http://www.physorg.com/news172758740.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on September 22 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(Duke University Medical Center) The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the research arm of the US Department of Defense, has awarded Duke University $19.5 million for an effort led by the Duke Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy to design a portable, easy-to-use diagnostic device that can reveal who is infected with an upper respiratory virus before the first cough or sneeze.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on September 21 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(University of California - Santa Barbara) New technologies may change our lives for the better, but sometimes they have risks. Communicating those benefits and risks to the public, and developing regulations to deal with them, can be difficult -- particularly if there's already public opposition to the technology.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on September 21 2009 by Thoughtbot
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IBM has a partnership with the US Department of Energy to build a 20 petaflops machine by 2011-2012*, followed by an exaflop machine (10^18 flops), the processing equivalent of about a billion PCs.IBM is also planning to develop over the next 10 years a machine capable of processing the exabyte (10^18) of data expected to flow per day from the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) telescope project. And the company is developing advanced algorithms in area... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on September 21 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Researchers are developing new ways to visualize information to analyze the world around us. A day of shipping traffic near Rotterdam, using data from ships: darker traces signify slower speeds and color coding shows traffic density (N. Willems / H. van de Wetering / J. van Wijk / TUE) (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/gallery/dn17746-visions-of-data)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on September 21 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Scripps Research Institute scientists have attached site-specific viral enzymes called recombinases to zinc fingers (ZFRs, proteins that bind to DNA) to accurately locate, snip, and repair DNA strands.The new technique could lead to safer gene therapies and more effective genetic engineering. (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20327266.400-genetic-seamstress-uses-molecular-fingers-to-tweak-dna.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on September 21 2009 by Thoughtbot
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A cheap laser can be used to trigger a chemical reaction for printing, controlled drug delivery inside the body, or industrial chemical synthesis, University of California, Berkeley scientists have found. Microcapsules are used to separate the chemicals in compartments, along with carbon nanotubes, which absorb light energy, heating the liquid inside until it explodes and releasing the contents.(Stafan Pastine) (Source: http://www.technologyrevi... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on September 21 2009 by Thoughtbot
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The Planck spacecraft has obtained its first peek at the cosmic microwave background afterglow of the big bang, revealing it in unprecedented detail that may contain hints of hidden extra dimensions or multiple universes, as well as providing clues to what caused a brief, early period of incredibly rapid cosmic expansion.(ESA/LFI/HFI Consortia/Axel Mellinger) (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn17807-probe-gets-clearest-glimpse-yet-of... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on September 21 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Some individuals in vegetative and minimally conscious states can learn and thereby demonstrate at least partial consciousness, scientists in Argentina and the UK report. By using classical Pavlonian conditioning, the researchers played a tone immediately prior to blowing air into a patient's eye. After some time training, the patients would start to blink when the tone played but before the air puff to the eye. This type of learning was not seen... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on September 21 2009 by Thoughtbot
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A combination of drugs, electrical stimulation and regular exercise can enable paralyzed rats to walk and even run again, UCLA researchers have discovered -- regeneration of severed nerve fibers is not required/The finding may have implications for human rehabilitation after spinal cord injuries. The scientists administered drugs that act on the neurotransmitter serotonin and applied low levels of electrical currents to the spinal cord below the p... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on September 21 2009 by Thoughtbot
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A simple one-minute beside eye-movement exam worked better than an MRI to distinguish new strokes from less serious disorders in patients complaining of dizziness, nausea and spinning sensations, stroke researchers at Johns Hopkins and the University of Illinois have found.The exam comprised looking for inability to keep the eyes stable as patients' heads were rotated rapidly to either side, looking for jerkiness as patients tracked a doctorâ... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on September 21 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(American Physical Society) This week in Physics: Photonic devices promise advances in applications ranging from computing to high-speed communication; and a new toolkit of equations will help theorists determine whether a potential agreement between particle physics and string theory is fact or fancy.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on September 21 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(Case Western Reserve University) The promise of carbon nanotubes to revolutionize everything from drug delivey to energy efficiency is thwarted by the difficulties of producing the right nanotubes for each job. Case Western Reserve University scientists have found that the right mix of metal catalysts can control the atomic-level structures that give the nanotubes desired properties.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on September 20 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(Albert Einstein College of Medicine) An innovative drug-delivery system -- nanoparticles encapsulating nitric oxide or prescription drugs -- shows promise for topical treatment of erectile dysfunction, according to a new study by scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on September 18 2009 by Thoughtbot
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