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News on Human Progress:
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(Kiel University) The performance of modern electronics increases steadily on a fast pace thanks to the ongoing miniaturization of the utilized components. However, severe problems arise due to quantum-mechanical phenomena when conventional structures are simply made smaller and reach the nanometer scale. Therefore current research focuses on the so-called bottom-up approach: the engineering of functional structures with the smallest possible buil... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular on November 12 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(University of Adelaide) Scientists at the University of Adelaide have made a breakthrough that could change the world's thinking on what light is capable of.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on November 12 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(Imperial College London) Research into designing and building unique "metamaterials" has received a £4.9 million funding boost from The Leverhulme Trust, it is announced today. Metamaterials can be used for invisibility 'cloaking' devices, sensitive security sensors that can detect tiny quantities of dangerous substances, and flat lenses that can be used to image tiny objects much smaller than the wavelength of light.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on November 12 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) Berkeley Lab researchers at the Molecular Foundry have created bowtie-shaped antennae that function as the first tunable nano color sorters, able to capture, filter and steer light at the nanoscale.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on November 12 2009 by Thoughtbot
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A study at Orebro University in Sweden indicates that mobile phones and other cordless telephones have at two biological effects on the brain: increased content of the protein transthyretin in the blood-cerebrospinal-fluid barrier (part of the brain's protection against outside influences), and various health symptoms reported by children and adolescents, with the connection strongest regarding headaches, asthmatic complaints, and impaired concent... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 12 2009 by Thoughtbot
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MIT researchers have proposed to build a tourist attraction called "The Cloud" in London for the 2012 Olympics. The structure would consist of two 400-foot tall mesh towers that are linked by a series of interconnected plastic bubbles, which would themselves house an observation deck inside and be used to display everything from Olympic scores and highlights to a "barometer of the city's interests and moods" outside. (Source: http://www.engadge... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 12 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Engineers at the University of California, Santa Cruz have developed a new approach to a fundamental problem in computer vision: how to program a computer to recognize or categorize what it "sees" in an image or video. The software analyzes the map of pixel relationships and determines the salient geometric features of the object or action. These components remain perceptually constant within an object regardless of image quality.Their software co... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 12 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have found a clear link between living to 100 and inheriting a hyperactive version of an enzyme that rebuilds telomeres (the tip ends of chromosomes). (Source: http://www.physorg.com/news177186096.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 12 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Iowa State University engineers have developed technology that converts 2-D medical scans into detailed 3-D images that can be used to plan a surgery or teach a lesson in anatomy. (Source: http://www.physorg.com/news177177522.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 12 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Prosthetic arms as nimble and light as the real thing, driverless cars that work their way through real traffic, a portable robotic emergency room, and scramjets able to race around the world in just a few hours are among the DARPA projects profiled by journalist Michael Belfiore in a new book, The Department of Mad Scientists. (Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20427335.700-darpa-inventing-this-side-of-the-impossible.html)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 12 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(North Carolina State University) Silicon nanowires are attracting attention from the electronics industry due to the drive for smaller devices, from cell phones to computers. The operation of these devices, and an array of additional applications, will depend on the mechanical properties of these nanowires. Research from North Carolina State University shows that silicon nanowires are far more resilient than their larger counterparts, a finding t... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular on November 11 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(New Jersey Institute of Technology) A free, day-long terrorism preparedness symposium covering counter-terrorist strategies and highlighting new and developing technologies to combat threats and regional concerns will be held at NJIT on Nov. 14, 2009, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on November 11 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists have replaced the large magnets needed for MRI by using a combination of "dynamic nuclear polarization" to align carbon 13 nuclei before they are injected into the body and a new generation of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDS) to pick up the signals used to reconstruct an image. That should make ultra low field MRI images of metabolism in action even easier to make and paves the way for... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 11 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Scientists such as Joanna Aizenberg, a materials scientist at Harvard University, are building new materials using inspiration from complex biological forms.She aims to decipher some of Mother Nature's unique designs, including dirt-resistant sea urchins and sea sponges made of super-strong light-conducting glass, to develop novel materials that, like these organisms, can self-assemble and sense and respond to their environment.Nanobristles (Joann... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 11 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Dr. J. Allan Hobson, a psychiatrist and sleep researcher at Harvard, argues that dreaming is a parallel state of consciousness that is continually running but normally suppressed during waking. This is supported by research on lucid dreaming, which has been found to have elements of both rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep and of waking. Hobson argues that the main function of REM, when most dreaming occurs, is physiological: the brain is warming its c... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 11 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Caltech researchers have developed simple nanometer-scale electronic circuits out of carbon nanotubes by sticking them to DNA origami in a desired geometric pattern.DNA origami is a type of self-assembled structure made from DNA that can be programmed to form nearly limitless shapes and patterns. It is created from a long single strand of viral DNA and a mixture of different short synthetic DNA strands that bind to and "staple" the viral DNA into ... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 11 2009 by Thoughtbot
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NASA Ames scientists studying the origin of life have non-biologically reproduced uracil (a component of RNA) in the laboratory, under conditions found in space, where pyrimidine (frozen in water ice) exposed to ultraviolet radiation produces uracil. (Source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091110070320.htm)
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 11 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have discovered that signalling via a receptor molecule called nogo receptor 1 (NgR1) in the nerve membrane plays a key part in forming lasting memories during the first week after an event.The scientists hope that their findings will eventually help in the development of new treatments for memory impairments, such as those related to Alzheimer's and stroke. Medicines designed to target the NgR1 receptor system... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 11 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(Purdue University) Purdue University researchers are making progress in developing a new type of transistor that uses a finlike structure instead of the conventional flat design, possibly enabling engineers to create faster and more compact circuits and computer chips.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on November 10 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(Clemson University) Clemson University is part of a five-year $3 million US Air Force Office of Scientific Research award, along with the University of Texas at Dallas and Yale University, to search for nanoscale materials that superconduct to allow for efficient flow of a current.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on November 10 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(Northwestern University) Researchers at the McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science at Northwestern University have developed, characterized, and modeled a new kind of probe used in atomic force microscopy, which images, measures, and manipulates matter at the nanoscale. Using diamond, researchers made a much more durable probe than the commercially available silicon nitride probes, which are typically used in AFM to gather informatio... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular on November 10 2009 by Thoughtbot
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(Vanderbilt University) With the support of a $2.7 million Recovery Act grant from the National Institute of Drug Abuse, an interdisciplinary team headed by Vanderbilt chemist John McLean and physicist John Wikswo will attempt to determine whether an individual's white blood cells retain chemical memories of exposure to drugs like cocaine and alcohol that can be read reliably and unambiguously.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on November 10 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Amid the hype -- including a viral marketing campaign for 2012, the disaster movie opening Friday, with bogus scientific organizations, press releases, and 2012 whistle-blowers --some people are developing "end times" anxiety that has experts seriously concerned. NASA's Nibiru and Doomsday 2012: Questions and Answers and 2012: Beginning of the End or Why the World Won't End? web pages seek to debunk stories about the fictional planet Nibiru and pr... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 10 2009 by Thoughtbot
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The long-held theory that our brains use different mechanisms for forming long-term and short-term memories has been challenged by new research from University College London.Their findings identify two distinct short-term memory networks in the brain: one that functions independently of the hippocampus and remains intact in patients with long-term memory deficits, and one that is dependent on the hippocampus and is impaired along with long-term m... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 10 2009 by Thoughtbot
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Scientists from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center have created penile erectile tissue and implanted it into male rabbits, developing the organ from implanted scaffolds seeded with cells from rabbit penile tissue."Our hope is that patients with congenital abnormalities, penile cancer, traumatic injury and some cases of erectile dysfunction will benefit from this technology in the future," said Anthony Atala, M.D., director of Wake Fores... More
KurzweilAI.net news made popular on November 10 2009 by Thoughtbot
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